Why Aren’t We Teaching You Mindfulness | AnneMarie Rossi | TEDxYouth@MileHigh



In this powerful talk, an instructor bringing mindfulness to shelters shares her research into how mindfulness can set us up for success and break cycles of transgenerational trauma.

AnneMarie Rossi is the founder and director of Be Mindful, a non-profit association of mindfulness instructors dedicated to making the practice accessible to all. They currently teach in Denver Public Schools, St. Vrain Public Schools, Urban Peak Youth Homeless Center, and through the Red Cross. While recently completing her undergraduate work at the University of Colorado Denver, she won the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program Grant to complete
research on the impacts of mindfulness instruction on 4th grade students in a Denver Public School.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

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28 thoughts on “Why Aren’t We Teaching You Mindfulness | AnneMarie Rossi | TEDxYouth@MileHigh

  1. I wonder then, why psychologists say that depression is caused by brain neuron defect. What I'm meaning is, it's physically broken by them but this talk is saying it can be cured a lot by psychological treatment. Well, then the depression shouldn't be chronic neuron damage, right?

  2. this is why i like this channel, it is like a gold mine . i find a video from last year or one that was uploaded less than an hour ago then i find out that this is what i wanted to know. i learn something new every day thanks to this channel 🙂

  3. All so self centered.
    " what can I do to help someone today? if I do good , I am humbly cooperating with the will of my loving maker. "
    what, ask yourself what is success?

  4. Powerful talk! I'll use this in my classes when I do mindfulness activities. There are many different practices that one can do, not only meditation, and students like variety. Here are some examples of projects that students have chosen – some of them self-created – that helped them become more mindful. (Scroll down to the bottom half of the entry for all the examples). https://martinschmidtinasia.wordpress.com/2016/05/26/teaching-for-self-transcendence-spiritual-practices-in-the-world-religions-classroom/

  5. I love the passion behind the message and completely agree that bringing mindfulness practices into the lives of young people should be the #1 priority of our education systems.
    Where I get lost is in comments like it's founded or its benefits are based on 30 years of science or studies showing its benefits..

    How about the thousands of years that people have been practicing it or have proven it through their way of life. One huge problem in the west or in western institutions is we're obsessed with this evidence, science… blah blah rather that the wisdom of people who've been doing this for thousands of years. I respect the need and value of science and research, evidence, etc. But why do we need to obsess or invest in studies to prove things that are so obvious! it's very silly.

  6. "why aren't we teaching it to you?" Why are you asking students why teachers aren't teaching them something? Shouldn't you be asking the teachers, school boards & college administrators?

  7. Having completed my Master's degree in Education : Emotional Education (Atlow Mill Centre for Emotional Education in the UK and University ) and having just completed additional training in Youth Mindfulness I am, having watched this TEDx, in the present moment, feeling even more optimistic and enthusiastic to implement this process of teaching Mindfulness to children as it truly meets my needs for purpose and meaning in life not to mention developing a more peaceful world.
    My engagment with Emotional Education and Mindfulness started with me recognising that I needed to take responsibility and do the work on myself first and for most.
    I'm so pleased I did as I am so much happier ad a result 🙂

  8. The Basics of Buddhist Meditation
    Dr. C. George Boeree
    Buddhism began by encouraging its practitioners to engage in smrti (sati) or mindfulness, that is, developing a full consciousness of all about you and within you — whether seated in a special posture, or simply going about one’s life. This is the kind of meditation that Buddha himself engaged in under the bodhi tree, and is referred to in the seventh step of the eightfold path.

  9. Perhaps they are not teaching mindfulness because mindfulness has no proper explanation.

    What Mindfulness Research Neglects

    Mindfulness is defined as non-judgmental or choice-less awareness. Choices in turn may be divided into non-perseverative choices (what to have for breakfast, what route to take to go home, or choices with no dilemmas) and perseverative choices (worries, distractions, and rumination, or mental dilemmas wherein every alternative is bad). All meditative procedures, including mindfulness, avoid both.

    The consistent avoidance of perseverative choice alone represents resting protocols, wherein the neuro-muscular activity is sharply reduced. In other words, when we want to be relaxed we isolate ourselves from distractive and worrisome events and thoughts. These states in turn correlate with increased levels of endogenous opioids or ‘endorphins’ in the brain. The benefits of this are manifest, as the sustained increase of endogenous opioids down regulates opioid receptors, and thus inhibits the salience or reward value of other substances (food, alcohol, drugs) that otherwise increase opioid levels, and therefore reduces cravings, as well as mitigating our sensitivity to pain. Profound relaxation also inhibits muscular tension and its concomitant discomfort. In this way, relaxation causes pleasure, enhances self-control, counteracts and inhibits stress, reduces pain, and provides for a feeling of satisfaction and equanimity that is the hallmark of the so-called meditative state.

    It may be deduced therefore that meditative states are primarily resting states, and that meditative procedures over-prescribe the cognitive operations that may be altered to provide its salutary benefits (that is, you just need to avoid perseverative choices, not all choices), and that meditation as a concept must be redefined.

    Finally, the objective measurement of neuro-muscular activity and its neuro-chemical correlates (long established in the academic literature on resting states) is in general ignored by the academic literature on mindfulness, which is primarily based upon self-reports and neurological measures (fMRI) that cannot account for these facts. The problem with mindfulness research is therefore not theoretical, but empirical, and until it clearly accounts for all relevant observables for brain and body, the concept will never be fully explained.

    More of this argument, including references, below including a link to the first study (published last year) that has discovered the presence of opioid activity due to mindfulness practice, as well as the 1988 Holmes paper which provided the most extensive argument to date that meditation was rest.

    http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(16)30302-3/abstract

    https://www.scribd.com/doc/284056765/The-Book-of-Rest-The-Odd-Psychology-of-Doing-Nothing

    https://www.scribd.com/document/291558160/Holmes-Meditation-and-Rest-The-American-Psychologist

  10. A reason for the non-acceptance of mindfulness is that it's not explained well.

    Perhaps if it can be explained simply wiuthout all of the cloudy new age metaphors, it would be accepted!!

    In other words mindfulness does not need more studies, it needs Occam's Razor!

    An elaboration of this argument is below, along with linked references.

    What Mindfulness Research Neglects

    Mindfulness is defined as non-judgmental or choice-less awareness. Choices in turn may be divided into non-perseverative choices (what to have for breakfast, what route to take to go home, or choices with no dilemmas) and perseverative choices (worries, distractions, and rumination, or mental dilemmas wherein every alternative is bad). All meditative procedures, including mindfulness, avoid both.

    The consistent avoidance of perseverative choice alone represents resting protocols, wherein the neuro-muscular activity is sharply reduced. In other words, when we want to be relaxed we isolate ourselves from distractive and worrisome events and thoughts. These states in turn correlate with increased levels of endogenous opioids or ‘endorphins’ in the brain. The benefits of this are manifest, as the sustained increase of endogenous opioids down regulates opioid receptors, and thus inhibits the salience or reward value of other substances (food, alcohol, drugs) that otherwise increase opioid levels, and therefore reduces cravings, as well as mitigating our sensitivity to pain. Profound relaxation also inhibits muscular tension and its concomitant discomfort. In this way, relaxation causes pleasure, enhances self-control, counteracts and inhibits stress, reduces pain, and provides for a feeling of satisfaction and equanimity that is the hallmark of the so-called meditative state.

    It may be deduced therefore that meditative states are primarily resting states, and that meditative procedures over-prescribe the cognitive operations that may be altered to provide its salutary benefits (that is, you just need to avoid perseverative choices, not all choices), and that meditation as a concept must be redefined.

    Finally, the objective measurement of neuro-muscular activity and its neuro-chemical correlates (long established in the academic literature on resting states) is in general ignored by the academic literature on mindfulness, which is primarily based upon self-reports and neurological measures (fMRI) that cannot account for these facts. The problem with mindfulness research is therefore not theoretical, but empirical, and until it clearly accounts for all relevant observables for brain and body, the concept will never be fully explained.

    More of this argument, including references, below including a link to the first study (published this year) that has discovered the presence of opioid activity due to mindfulness practice, as well as the 1988 Holmes paper which provided the most extensive argument to date that meditation was rest.

    http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(16)30302-3/abstract

    https://www.scribd.com/doc/284056765/The-Book-of-Rest-The-Odd-Psychology-of-Doing-Nothing

    https://www.scribd.com/document/291558160/Holmes-Meditation-and-Rest-The-American-Psychologist

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